Fellows

Oleksiy Radynski, Grant Watson

Online Screening of Oleksiy Radynski’s Landslide and Interview with Grant Watson

BAK 2019/2020 Fellow Oleksiy Radynski’s film Landslide (2016) premieres online 26 August 2020 as part of the screening series From Matter to Data: Ecology of Infrastructures, 29 July–9 September 2020, Museum of Modern Art, New York. This series presents a selection of 15 films and video works available in three part. Radynski’s film is part of the third screening “Past’s Futures: Anthropocene or Capitalocene?”, screened from 26 August until 9 September 2020. Read more about the screening series at MoMA’s screening platform post here.

As part of his Fellowship research trajectory and project How We Behave, BAK 2019/2020 Fellow Grant Watson interviewed the Fellows about resistance and political practices. Radynski spoke about Landslide. Read some of the interview below! This interview will be part of the culmination of the Fellowship program Propositions #12: Waves Breaking Walls, Futures in Movement taking place 12 September 2020.

 

Grant Watson: Tell me about the place where Landslide was shot.

Oleksiy Radynski: Several years ago, there was a situation where my collective and other collectives and artists occupied a piece of land in central Kiev that had been abandoned because of a natural and social disaster in the 1990s. This abandoned area gradually emerged as a refuge, or last resort, for a lot of counter cultural artists. We’ve been running a small space in a garage coop, basically a cluster of workshops and DIY studios. It was completely fluid, completely makeshift, and not a very comfortable situation, but it seemed to me that there were some constellations of really interesting artists and practitioners there, who did things in the same place at the same period of time. So, it was interesting for me to document it, to make people discuss their work on camera and argue about things we’ve been arguing about for quite some time.

This was this situation of an ephemeral queer existence of several avant-garde personalities, which I decided to capture this with a film. By making the work, I thought I would kind of claim that this was something that actually exists, and that’s something others maybe have to remember. Otherwise it would completely evaporate. So, in a way the film almost faked this phenomenon, or this artistic situation, or this artistic cluster, because that is what films do in most cases. On film things look more interesting than they are in life, for better or worse. So, this was an experiment in making things real by fictionalizing them a little bit, or by manipulating them—things that maybe wouldn’t be real otherwise.

Taking over this territory in the city center was like the return of the humans to an area that was taken from them by the forces of nature and of social destruction. In the 1990s, there was a kind of small-scale apocalypse, a geological disaster, a landslide, in this area—and since then it has been uninhabited, abandoned. A whole street of 19th century bourgeois buildings that ceased to exist in the 90s because the state structures collapsed, and social structures collapsed. Nature, as we now know, restores itself very quickly in these situations. In the course of ten years there was just a wood there and then humans started to return to this area that they were kicked out from, and the first to come were artists, as sometimes happens.

GW: What was your relation to the characters of Landslide prior to filming?

OR: I’ve known most of these people for a very long time and I knew them as interesting thinkers. For instance, some of the conversations we’ve had with an artist Vova Vorotniov over the years ended up being included in the film, but in a completely improvised way, so it is a completely non-staged, documentary film. One of these conversations is about the issue of non-alienated labor, something that unexpectedly came up in a lot of talks and interviews in the film. Because this whole area was an experiment in liberating one’s labor, the small-scale liberation of artistic labor—which is of course problematic because this kind of liberation can’t really work properly if it only happens on a small scale. It only works, if it works for everyone. One of the conversations that was pertinent at that time and maybe still is, maybe even more so, is the question of liberation in the here and now versus the idea of struggle. The idea of struggle is something that is always delayed, and you have to always fight towards some defined goal or situation or state of affairs that probably never arrives, or if it does arrive, it probably comes in a completely different form than what you expect.

Of course, this is a very old debate, roughly, between Anarchists and Marxists, which was reproduced in a way in that environment. There is this anarchist school of thought which claims that the only struggle worth fighting for is a struggle that starts with the here and now. That you should just live your utopia right here and right now and not create the conditions for the better life, something which the Marxist revolutionaries are invested in. So, this then, was an attempt to just start living the life that we would like to live. It was a very short-lived kind of space where this could be possible at least long enough to make a film. Of course, it was super ephemeral, like most of these initiatives are, and basically it only exists in the film. In reality everything was not so bright, and none of us actually liberated our labor for good.

There were people who were talking about labor and the liberation of labor, and there was another faction of people who were just silently doing things—but not in the sense that someone was taking the privilege of discourse while the others had to labor. Doing something was also a statement, so one could make statements by doing things rather than talking. In the film, for instance, an architectural collective called Pylorama are building a construction, a kind of a hybrid space for performance, a venue for the different practices that people in the area were involved with. They are building this open-air venue with an auditorium like a theater, a bit like a small-scale theater of Dionysus in Greece—it is long shot, but it was a small-scale experiment in producing this kind of space. The area evolved in different forms over time, but all of the collaboration on building the theater structure lasted for one month and the filming also lasted for one month.

GW: Tell me about the queer performance collective that has a strong presence in the film.

OR: The time of the filming was kind of a special moment in the life of this area because it was joined by Misha Koptev, an artist who had fled from the occupied territories in Eastern Ukraine, from the city of Luhansk. This was a queer artist who for several decades used to run a queer performance troupe in the city. His practice merged theater, performance art, and DIY queer fashion and all this was happening in a quite conservative city in Eastern Ukraine, really close to Russia. Post-industrial or industrial regions sometimes have this homophobic reputation, so it was surprising for me to know that this was the only self-organized queer theater group anywhere in the whole of the country. He has somehow been tolerated there and had some type of venue that was frequented by all kinds of people. But then he had to flee after Russian proxies took over when this region was occupied by actually fascist, ultra-patriotic pro-Russian forces, and then at some point, simply by regular Russian forces. This made his work and existence there impossible.

And so Misha Koptev fled to Kiev and he actually ended up in this cluster of garages, and my collective welcomed him into the venue we used to run, and we turned one of the garages into a kind of a base for his activities. He assembled a new troop from amongst the artists and performers in Kiev, and he started to rehearse with his new troupe there. It was a different situation for the whole cluster, as even though there’s quite a strong queer scene in Kiev, this was something radical, in terms of bodily presence and nudity and all kinds of transgressions that happen during his performances.

GW: It seems that his performances are appropriating the elements of fashion industry and therefore can be easily commododified.

OR: Misha appropriates this language from the catwalk, but he takes it to a different dimension that is undigestible for commercial fashion. He subverts the catwalk completely, so he never had any kind of commercial success and his shows were never commodified. His practice is based on improvised dressing up. He collects and assembles all kinds of costumes, or discarded elements, second-hand stuff, or something that someone would find in the trash and then during the performance they improvise by continuously changing these costumes. And all this cannot really be repeated because these costumes only exist for the several minutes that the performer is on the catwalk.  So, I think he is actually avoiding commodification although I’m not sure if he is doing it consciously, it just emerges from the way he works. Although he would not be really opposed to some kind of commodification as a person who is living in poverty.

Before Misha’s arrival, this whole cluster looked a little bit like a hetero lad, graffiti, masculine, slightly macho scene, and it was interesting to observe the inclusion of this really strong queer component.  I’ve been cautious about possible homophobic situations with regards to Misha. But as there was this fairly loose vision of what kind of local utopia was going to emerge – his art and his position was totally included. Misha brought a very strong queer spirit to the place. This also contributed to a spirit of sexual liberation, which was already present in the area anyway. Misha was hoping for this place to become a cruising area, which I think happened to some extent.

GW: So was the ampitheater constructed there specifically for Misha’s performance?

OR: The amphitheater was not created for the sake of Misha’s performance, it was basically a collective work by various people and groups who came up with this idea, while Misha’s troupe was on the margins rehearsing, but in the end, it turned out that this spontaneous process led to the creation of a space that would be best utilized by him. It is partly because Misha always does these kinds of site-specific performances, and this place turned out to be the probably his best setting. His performances only make sense to you if you are physically watching them in the here and now. They are an act of ecstatic climax, they cannot really be planned and are to a very large extent improvised. It’s basically about people doing things they truly like to do in life, but they will never admit this to each other or themselves. It’s about a moment of complete bodily and instinctual liberation, a kind of happiness in the here and now, that cannot be reproduced and cannot be really documented. And let’s not forget that before the amphitheater for the Greeks emerged as the site for the Dionysian unconscious, the theater of Dionysus that gave birth to performance out of ecstatic dance and ritual—which then became a way of reflecting the community to itself.

 

 

 

more from Oleksiy Radynski

  • War and Cinema

    BAK 2019/2020 Fellow Oleksiy Radynski curates a War and Cinema, an art film program on e-flux that explores differing uses of moving image media and war.

    read more
  • Is Data the New Gas?

    “In 2017, The Economist famously claimed that “data is the new oil.” At the time, Wendy Chun’s response to this statement was: “Big data is the new COAL. The result: global social change. Intensely energized and unstable clouds.”12 Still, both coal and oil are likely to decline as energy sources. Another question worth asking, then, is: what […]

    read more
  • Aliens, Spacetime, Storytelling, and Infrastructure: December Fellows Intensive

    In December 2019 the BAK 2019/2020 Fellows gather for their third Fellows Intensive, co-convened by Fellows Oleksiy Radynski, David Muñoz Alcántara, and Diana McCarty along with BAK. Synthesizing and pushing their own and each other’s individual research trajectories, in December the Fellows visit local institutions like IMPAKT, Casco Art Institute, and Universiteitsmuseum; create and participate […]

    read more

Related content

Jota Mombaça: Visionary Fiction, Activist Writing, and Critical Practices

BAK 2018/2019 Fellows Thiago de Paula Souza and Mick Wilson, along with BAK, co-convene the April 2019 Fellows Intensive focusing on conceptions of violence. Along with screenings, presentations, and discussions curated and conducted by these Fellows, artists, writer, and performer Jota Mombaça joins the Fellows to lead them through collective reading exercises, collaborative writing processes, […]

Fellows at Le Guess Who?

  On Friday 8 November, BAK 2018/2019 Fellow Jeanne van Heeswijk and Utrecht-based experimental music festival Le Guess Who connect visual artist, activist, womanist, and fellow Fellow Patricia Kaersenhout with Chicago-based pianist, clarinetist, and composer Angel Bat Dawid for an event as part of Trainings for the Not-Yet (14 September 2019–12 January 2020). Both women tap […]

Shela Sheikh: Colonialism, Cultivation, and Nonhuman Witnessing

As part of the Fellowship weekly intensive in November 2017, Fellow Luigi Coppola convenes a number of discussions including a seminar with lecturer and researcher Shela Sheikh on 24 November 2017 to talk about colonialism, cultivation and nonhuman witnessing and resistance to the colonial mode of organizing, appropriating and extracting value. In the afternoon session […]

Collective Dictionary: Xenia with Elena Isayev

Elena Isayev is a historian and professor at University of Exeter uses the ancient Mediterranean to explore migration, belonging, displacement and spatial perception. Her research is based on the intersection of Hospitality and Asylum, Potency of Displaced Agency, Common and Public Space. Her interdisciplinary and inter-practice approach has led to collective learning and research beyond the […]

The Ether and Radio Alhara: Ella Finer, Hazem Jamjoum, and Reem Shadid

Fellow Urok Shirhan convenes a session with BAK, centering her research on audio forms,”collective listening, acoustic commons, and… what the shift from the eye to the ear could hold for us.” Over two days and a few digital sessions, Fellows heard talks about historic uses of radio, listened to sound pieces alone together, and experimented […]

BAK Fellow Shay Raviv at DoorVanVoor

BAK 2020 Fellow Shay Raviv represents De Voorkamer at DoorVanVoor Excursion # 3: On the road in Utrecht!, Stedelijk Museum Schiedam, 25 September 2020. De Voorkamer is an inclusive meeting space in which the talents of status holders, people living in asylum seekers’ centers, and other local communities are encouraged, and a space that BAK […]

Diana McCarty in Deserting from the Culture Wars

BAK, basis voor actuele kunst, Utrecht and MIT Press, Cambridge, MA and London present Deserting from the Culture Wars, the second reader in BAK’s BASICS series, edited by Maria Hlavajova and Sven Lütticken. Deserting from the Culture Wars reflects upon and intervenes in our current moment of ever-more polarizing ideological combat, often seen as the return of […]

Charl Landvreugd Named Head of Research & Curatorial Practice at Stedelijk Museum

Congratulations to BAK 2018/2019 Fellow Charl Landvreugd on his new position as Head of Research & Curatorial Practice at Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam! We know that he will do important, critical, and motivating work.

Civilization at the Crossroad: Co-Curated by Lukáš Likavčan

Lukáš Likavčan and Pavel Sterec curate Civilization at the Crossroad: Engineers of Scientific-Technical Revolution at FUTURA gallery, Prague (4 December 2018–17 February 2019), reflecting on research done by philosopher Radovan Richta and his team in the 1960s and “a new Czechoslovakian socialism.” In addition to historical documents and media, the exhibition includes works by artists: […]

Regarding Curatorial Activism, the Role of History and Archives

As part of the 2nd Tehran Curatorial Symposium: Curator as Translator, January 2019, Katayoun Arian was invited by organizer, Fereshte Moosavi to speak on curatorial activism. Drawing parallels between the role of history, archival practices, activism, and the decolonial turn, she views the space in which the act of translation unfolds to act as a […]

Announcing the Post-Academic BAK 2019/2020 Fellows

BAK, basis voor actuele kunst, Utrecht is proud to announce its BAK 2019/2020 Fellows, ten outstanding practitioners in the arts, theory, and social action from the Netherlands and abroad. These fellows have been selected for their advanced artistic and other expressive practices, interdisciplinary excellence, critical insight, and collaborative strategies from approximately 200 applicants. The BAK […]

Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner Too?

BAK Fellow Patricia Kaersenhout, artist, activist and womanist, created Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner Too?  a solo exhibition as a social monument, alongside a growing community of collaborators. The opening takes a place at De Appel on 4 October, 2019.

Propositions #12: Waves Breaking Walls, Futures in Movement

BAK, basis voor actuele kunst, Utrecht, proudly invites you to Propositions #12: Waves Breaking Walls, Futures in Movement, a culmination of the BAK 2019/2020 Fellowship Program. In the course of the past year, the Fellows individually and collectively developed their research engaging with the pressing issues of the contemporary in concert with BAK’s research focus, Propositions for Non-Fascist […]

Introduction to Comparative Planetology

BAK 2018/2019 Fellow Lukáš Likavčan’s publication  Introduction to Comparative Planetology (2019, Strelka Press) is the culmination of long term research, including his research as a BAK Fellow. The book-essay, according to  Likavčan, “presents an intertwined analysis of visual cultures of imagining the Earth and geopolitics of climate emergency. It compares different “figures” of the planet […]

Closing Dinner for Trainings For The Not-Yet, with Jeanne van Heeswijk and Bakudapan

On 22 December 2019,  Trainings for the Not-Yet (14 September 2019–12 January 2020), the exhibition as a series of trainings co-convened by artist and BAK 2018/2019 Fellow Jeanne Van Heeswijk and BAK, ends with a communal meal, cooked by the Bakudapan Food Study Group! with the Basic Activist Kitchen.  The communal meal, convened around sharing food […]

March BAK 2018/2019 Fellows Intensive with activists, artists, and theorists in Barcelona

BAK 2018/2019 Fellows Yasmine Eid-Sabbagh and Jeanne van Heeswijk co-convened the March Fellows Intensive with critic, writer, and curator Ethel Baraona Pohl in Barcelona. The Intensive focused on, among other things, collective practices and facilitation, housing movements, artistic action, and neighborhood initiatives. The Fellows had the privilege of getting to speak in depth with members of La Borda, Calàbria 66, Can Batlló, La Ciutat Invisible, La Col, Coòpolis, De Veí a Veí, Espai en Blanc and Marina Garcés, Fil a l’agulla, La Lleialtat Santsenca, and La PAH.

Practicing Tactical Solidarities: A Roundtable on Mutual Aid, Emergency, and Continuous Care

Streaming online at bakonline.org/prospections and on social media: @BAKUtrecht on Facebook and @BAK basis voor actuele kunst on YouTube With Afrikaanderwijk Cooperative (including BAK 2018/2019 Fellow Jeanne van Heeswijk), Rotterdam; the Basic Activist Kitchen, Utrecht; Brigate Volontarie per l’emergenza, Milan; and Homebaked Anfield, Liverpool Coordinated communitarian responses to this crisis have abounded, with individuals and […]

May BAK 2018/2019 Fellows Intensive: Models, Timelines, Scale, and Guest Ramon Amaro

BAK 2018/2019 Fellows Haseeb Ahmed and Lukáš Likavčan co-convene, along with BAK, the April Fellows Intensive focusing on modelling, timelining, scale, and the social and political aspects that shape and inform these. Along with presentations, screenings, and experiments in pedagogy and workshops curated and conducted by these Fellows, machine learning researcher and designer Ramon Amaro […]

Latitude On Air – Unsettling Power Relations

BAK 2019/2020 Fellow Diana McCarty works with Goethe-Institut and her project reboot.fm, both Berlin, to co-create a multi-day long experimental radio program Latitude On Air – Unsettling Power Relations (2020), and exploring ideas of locality, being together, and social justice and legacies of colonialism. As part of the program, co-Fellow David Muñoz Alcántara is commissioned […]

Take a Risk and Explore: The Visualisation of the Dutch Cleaners’ Movement

Excerpt from the article: On a summer’s day in 2011 a large group of workers gathered at the entrance of the headquarters of the Federation of the Dutch Trade Unions (FNV) in Amsterdam. The workers, all FNV members, were there to show their dissatisfaction with the negotiations for a new general pension agreement. It had […]

Gathering in these Times: Extension, Intensives, Culmination in September

Due to the many effects of the pandemic, the Fellowship Program has shifted significantly. With fatigue, urgencies, the traps of digitalization, travel restrictions, expanding global inequalities, calls for actions, the massive changes generally and looming dangers, the Fellowship Program cannot continue in the form it once was. In addition to meeting online and searching for […]

Collective Dictionary: Inhabiting

Inhabiting is an outcome of the collaboration between Al Maeishah (Isshaq Al-Babrbary, Elena Isayev, and Diego Segatto) and the Office of Displaced Designers (ODD), who invited Al Maeishah to implement their research on The Alternative Atlas of Lesvos: An Island for the World. The atlas aims to intersect with those forcibly displaced, with the global web […]

Charl Landvreugd’s Movt. Nr. 10: Ososma

BAK 2018/2019 Fellow Charl Landvreugd creates a large-scale, solo installation exhibition Movt. Nr. 10: Ososma at CBK Zuidoost, Amsterdam (25/10–13/12/2019). The exhibition is a self-portrait and a critical reflection on cultural hybridity, integral to Landvreugd’s work, research, and current times.

A Conversation on: The Power of Doing Nothing

BAK 2019/2020 Fellow Joy Mariama Smith and BAK 2017/2018 BAK Fellow Quinsy Gario join Framer Framed for A Conversation on: The Power of Doing Nothing (2020), a radio program discussing productivity, refusal, and the racialized inequalities of rest. 

The Wind Egg

From 15 September 2018–6 January 2019 BAK Fellow Haseeb Ahmed has had a solo show IN SITU: Haseeb Ahmed – The Wind Egg as part of the In Situ series at M HKA, Antwerp. For millennia ancient Egyptian, Aran, Indian, European, and Chinese cultures have conceptualized the wind egg, suggesting that the wind can fertilize […]

Sepake Angiama Curator of 2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial

BAK 2017/2018 Fellow Sepake Angiama co-curates the 2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial …And Other Such Stories.  As part of the program, Fellow 2017/2018 BAK Fellows Ola Hassanain’s work was part of the exhibition. From the curators’ statement: “Titled …and other such stories, the 2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial is rooted in close readings of the spatial realities of its […]

BAK 2019/2020 Fellows Gather for the First Fellows Intensive!

The BAK 2019/2020 Fellows gathered at BAK in Utrecht for their first of seven Fellows Intensives together. Throughout the week, the Fellows presented their work, motivations, and research; learned about BAK, Utrecht, and each other; ate meals together; planned activities; found unlikely and motivating places of connection; imagined possibilities; shared references, pieces, and publications; met […]

Suely Rolnik: The Spheres of Insurrection

As part of the Fellowship program in November 2017, Wendelien van Oldenborgh convenes and moderates a (Skype) seminar with psychoanalyst, cultural critic, and curator Suely Rolnik. During this seminar, Rolnik discusses her text ”The Spheres of Insurrection: Suggestions for Combatting the Pimping of life” and how microspheric modes of existence are capable of interrupting the […]

False Heroes Must Be Forgotten: Rotunda Magazine conversation with Thiago de Paula Souza

Carolina Martínez speaks with BAK 2018/2019 Fellow Thiago de Paula Souza about his role as a curator of the 10th Berlin Biennale for Rotunda Magazine. From the article: Last month finished the latest Berlin Biennale, developed under the curatorial concept “We don’t need another hero”, where the concepts of power that we drag from imperialism […]

Rehearsing in Public with the BAK Fellows

On Wednesday 12 February 2020, BAK 2019/2020 Fellows Mijke van der drift and Joy Mariama Smith, along with BAK, co-convene a participatory panel. Along with artist Ahmed El Gendy and poet and activist Nat Raha, they rehearse in public experimental and collective practices that they are trying out in their research. The participatory panel aims to […]

Consent, Logic, and Loss: Fellows Intensive

In February, the BAK 2019/2020 Fellows come together for another Fellows Intensive. This week experiments with various communication practices being researched by Joy Mariama Smith and Mijke van der Drift, the BAK Fellows who co-convene this intensive along with BAK, and Curator of the BAK 2019/2020 Fellowship Program Whitney Stark and focuses on  consent, and […]

The Emotional Body

BAK 2018/2019 Fellows Jessica de Abreu and Patricia Kaersenhout, along with BAK, convene the January 2019 Fellows Intensive, focusing on the body as an archive, as a form of resistance, and the colonial legacies embodied today. Kaersenhout performs The Emotional Body (2018) for the Fellows, as well as guests from HKU University of the Arts, […]

Ending the Post-Academic BAK 2018/2019 Fellowship

In June 2019, the post-academic BAK 2018/2019 Fellowship comes to a close. After ten months of intensive thinking, imagining, enacting, practicing, troubling, discussing, laughing, sometimes even crying, the Fellows continue on their work in differing forms. Throughout our time together, the Fellows and their research have influenced and transformed each other’s as well as BAK. […]

Propositions for Non-Fascist Living: Tentative and Urgent Published!

BAK has published the first publication in a series on our research trajectory Propositions for Non-Fascist Living (2017–ongoing), Propositions for Non-Fascist Living: Tentative and Urgent (MIT Press, 2019). Moving from critique to propositions, the project attempts to articulate and inhabit methods of de-individualized living and to practice ways in which multiplicity and difference establish relations […]

To Dig A Hole That Collapses Again

A survey exhibition of Otobong Nkanga’s works is presented for the first time in the US. The exhibition titled To Dig A Hole That Collapses Again opens at the Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA), Chicago from 31 March–9 September 2018.

Charl Landvreugd Accepted to De Akademie van Kunsten

Congratulations to Charl landvreugd, who has been accepted to the Dutch Akademie van Kunsten! De Akademie aims to interpret the voice of the arts in Dutch society (including politics) and to promote interaction between the arts themselves, art and society, and between science and art. It annually elects new members based on demonstrable artistic achievements.  […]

First Fellows Intensive of the BAK 2020 Fellowship Program

In September the Netherlands-based stream of the BAK 2020 Fellows gather at BAK, with social distance, to begin their work together. Through mapping exercises, establishing collective protocols (or something close to it), spending time with the BAK team, and sharing well-ventilated space, a sense of what is to come in the Fellowship has emerged. This […]

Arun Saldanha: Reontologising Race and the Post-Colonial Body

BAK 2018/2019 Fellows Jessica de Abreu and Patricia Kaersenhout, along with BAK and Curator of the BAK 2018/2019 Fellowship Program Whitney Stark, convene the January 2019 Fellows Intensive, focusing on the body as an archive, as a form of resistance, and the colonial legacies embodied today. Geographer and theorist Arun Saldanha joins the Fellows to […]

BAK Fellows in MaHKU Graduation Show: If Not Now

Several generations of Fellows are involved in this year’s MaHKU, Utrecht, graduation show If Not Now, taking place at BAK from 30 September–11 October 2020. One BAK 2020 Fellowship position has been awarded to the Mutual Support Platform (MSP), a space for conversations and actions by/between/for students, alumni, and teachers of the MAFA HKU, Utrecht. […]

Fellows Intensive Joins Propositions #9: Deserting from the Culture Wars

The BAK 2019/2020 Fellows gathered in Utrecht for the second time in November. Along with mapping ideas and sharing research, they joining programming and trainings for BAK’s Propositions #9: Deserting from the Culture Wars, co-convened with writer and curator Sven Lütticken as a temporary spin-off from Trainings for the Not-Yet and the ninth iteration of BAK’s long-term […]