work

30 January–01 May 2016

Common Assembly – Decolonizing Architecture Art Residency (DAAR)

Decolonizing Architecture Art Residency (DAAR), Common Assembly

Common Assembly is a cross-section of an abandoned and never used Palestinian Parliament in Jerusalem, scaled to fit the ground floor space at BAK. Its construction, which began in 1996 during the Oslo Accord, was halted in 2003 after the Second Intifada, or Palestinian uprising, marked the failure of the political process. Discovering that the building was, intentionally or not, built on Israel’s unilaterally declared border within Jerusalem, DAAR developed the film and installation Common Assembly, which highlight the strip of land, partly within Israeli territory and partly within Palestinian land, which is in legal limbo. In the context of the exhibition Unstated (or, Living Without Approval), Common Assembly provides a forum for works of art and discourse to unfold over the course of the project.

Suggestions from the archive

Assembly and Public Forum

Collaboration and Open call

Conversation

16 December 2020, 19.00-21.00

Practicing Tactical Solidarities II: A Roundtable on Mutual Aid, Emergency, and Continuous Care

This locally-focused second edition of Practicing Tactical Solidarities: A Roundtable on Mutual Aid, Emergency, and Continuous Care features artists, organizers, and activists working in Utrecht, many of whom are current BAK Fellows. While addressing changing needs and urgencies in the protracted pandemic reality and its overlapping and related crises, the conversation contends with tactics and lessons in creating mutual aid networks, lasting support systems, and emergency care.

Exhibitionary

16 October, 08.00–29 November, 23.59 2020

Screening Tony Cokes at Stadhuisbrug, Utrecht

As part of exhibition Tony Cokes: To Live as Equals, Cokes’s video work c.my.skull.2. (Evil.13: Alternate Versions) is screened in public space until 29 November 2020! The work is on view in the window of Stadhuisbrug 5 (until Monday 2 November 2020), and in the window of Utrecht City Hall, Stadhuisbrug 1 (until Sunday 29 November 2020).